HOME
STRUCTURE
LESSONS
TEMPLES
CALENDAR
LUSTRATION
WITAN COUNCIL
THE GIVERS
ZONE
NEW!
ADVENTURES
BIOS
FACES OF CORRELLIANISM
HISTORY
LITERATURE
AWARDS NEW!
SYMBOLS
AND ROBES
LINKS
STORE
APPLICATIONS
CORRELLIAN HERALD NEWSLETTER
CORRELLIAN TIMES MAGAZINE  

Donate to the Tradition




Buy a Witch School Membership through this button and 25%  goes to support the Correllian Tradition

Rev. Terry Power, HP



Above: Rev. Terry Power HP, of Celtic Cross Temple.

The Reverend Terry Power is a High Priest, ordained minister, and Temple Head in the Correllian Nativist Tradition of Wicca.  A child with Cherokee and Irish ancestry, he was a teenager in the 70’s and young adult in the 80’s.  Raised in the Episcopal Church in the US, he found the freedom to pursue his spiritual side.  As an empath, he has always had a firm sense of the Divine, as an entity, at work in the universe and in the world.  

In 1983, he was gifted with a copy of “Helping Yourself with White Witchcraft” by Al Manning.  This began his ongoing work as a “Practical Magician” and developed his will and a deeper connection to the Divine.  He continued to operate within the framework of the Episcopal Church as he continued to develop his spiritual nature.



Above: Rev. Terry and members of Celtic Cross Temple,
Barbados Campus, Year 9 Aquarius / 2009 AD.



Above: The sigil of Celtic Cross Temple


While attending Episcopal churches, Rev. Power became a teacher of Anglican Theology and a learned the value of service.  Twice rejecting appointment to seminary, his lay ministry included teaching, serving as a chalice bearer, delegate to diocesan conventions, and chartering a new mission.

By the end of the millennium, however, he had realized his personal concepts of the Divine had outgrown the church of his youth.  In fact, he recalls with humor, the day an Episcopal priest first used what Terry calls the “H word” during a conversation.  “There was actually a name for the particular heresy I had uttered in that discussion,” he chuckles.  
“I knew then it was time to move on.” 


With that encounter, he realized his understanding of the Divine was now at odds with his church.  He discovered a short time later that it was more in line with the rapidly emerging Pagan movement – particularly the Wiccan faith.

In 2000, he found the Correllian Nativist Tradition of Wicca and has been deeply involved since that time.  As a mentor, he has worked with students all over the world.  He has also assisted directly with the establishment of at least three Shrines in the Correllian Tradition as well as his own Celtic Cross Temple.  As a Temple Head, he continues to work with students on the internet and in-person, sharing his relationship with the Divine.  



Above: Rev. Terry Power attends the Deemster's Council at the Lustration of the Living, New York, Year 5 Aq. / 2005 AD.


Since embracing his Wiccan path, Lord Terry has become a prolific writer on Pagan topics, beginning with a regular column in the Dayton (Ohio) Area Pagans’ Network newsletter entitled “A Spellcrafter’s Perspective” that chronicles his practical magician’s take on all things Wiccan.  His Sabbat articles, called “pagan sermons” by friends, speak to the deeper inner growth of pagan faiths using the Wheel of the Year as the vehicle for his message of Love and spiritual development.




Above: Rev. Terry and members of the Correllian High Priesthood
at the Lustration of the Ancestors, Olympia, WA, 23 April Year 7 Aq.
L to R: Rev. Terry Power HP, Rev. Debbe Tompkins HP, Rev. Virginia Powell HP,
Rev. Don Lewis HP (back row), Rev. Moonstorm HP, and Rev. Windy Lajoie HP.

Not bitter, Lord Terry has brought the experiences he gained in the Episcopal Church, along with his unique understanding of theology and the Divine to his Wiccan ministry.  He continues to write on pagan topics, works on pagan community building, and decries intolerance in any form.  His article “The Disease of Denominationalism” has been widely distributed on the internet and speaks to the very heart of his personal ministry.

Current projects include the development of a workshop on Clergy Ethics in the Pagan communities (attended by Oberon Zell in 2007), continued writing and teaching, and an ever-expanding ministry of religious unity, mutual respect, and tolerance.