HOME
STRUCTURE
LESSONS
TEMPLES
CALENDAR
LUSTRATION
WITAN COUNCIL
THE GIVERS
ZONE
NEW!
ADVENTURES
BIOS
FACES OF CORRELLIANISM
HISTORY
LITERATURE
AWARDS NEW!
SYMBOLS
AND ROBES
LINKS
STORE
APPLICATIONS
CORRELLIAN HERALD NEWSLETTER
CORRELLIAN TIMES MAGAZINE  

Donate to the Tradition




Buy a Witch School Membership through this button and 25%  goes to support the Correllian Tradition


Blv. Caroline High Correll




Above: Caroline High Correll and her daughters Mable and Dollie, c. 1914

Caroline High Correll claimed to come from a family of hereditary Witches, although what her birth family actually believed or practiced will probably never be known with certainty. What is known is that the family followed some sort of unorthodox religious practice and that they maintained a secluded compound near the Indiana/Illinois border where Caroline High was born in 1860. In 1864 Caroline’s family left the compound, but not the family, to live in nearby Danville, Illinois.



Caroline High Correll, c. 1879.

In 1876 the High family compound was destroyed by federal authorities in a Waco-style raid that left many of the family members and their supporters dead. In subsequent months many other family members were tried, imprisoned, or executed including some of Caroline’s closest relatives. All her life Caroline maintained that the charges that led to the raid were false, and attributed them to racial and religious bigotry.


In 1879 Caroline founded a “new family” which became known as the Correllian Tradition, after her married name: Correll. Caroline claimed that this Tradition was built upon the beliefs of her birth family, but also incorporated new elements throughout her lifetime, as have her successors.  


Caroline and her husband John Correll traveled widely and operated a number of businesses over the years. For many years the operated a carnival during the summer, and worked as “Art Lecturers” during the winter using what was then cutting edge technology that was as much an attraction as the art they exhibited.

Caroline worked as a psychic reader, and was an attraction at her own carnival. Caroline’s eldest daughter, Dora High Correll, also was also an attraction at the carnival, performing on the high trapeze without a net. Dora’s death in 1898 brought the carnival to an end. Her parent’s marriage ended not long after.

Right: Dora High-Correll and her husband from a promotional photo taken to promote their trapeze act, c. 1897.

 
Whatever the beliefs of Caroline’s ancestors may have been, she became involved in European Witchcraft in the early 1900s. Caroline was a close friend of, and may have been related to, the artist Lydia Becket. Becket introduced Caroline to Aradianism –an Americanized form of Italian Stregheria Witchcraft as filtered through Leland’s Aradia. Many Aradian ideas have been central to Correllianism ever since.

Caroline continued to work as a psychic reader until her death. She also performed healings, and sold herbal remedies and charms of various kinds. In addition to Correllianism, which was a private familial tradition at the time, Caroline was also prominent in the Spiritualist movement and in the Universalist movement.

Left: Caroline High Correll, c. 1900


Caroline High Correll died in 1939, and was succeeded as Head of the High-Correll family by her daughter Mable.

Right: Mable High-Correll c. 1925